Artemis Lucky: A Tale to be Told

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Artemis Lucky: A Tale to be Told

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As many of you might be unaware, from late April to early August, our local Blacktail deer give birth to their offspring. For some of us we look forward to watching the mothers go from being pregnant to running around with a little “Bambi” or two, or maybe three. However, this time can also be bitter sweet. With more cars on the road to Yosemite and more babe deer being born the risks of hitting one goes up. Locals who live here know that it can happen at any time but there is very little warning to non-locals visiting the area that the chances are very high a darting deer may cross their path. This story is about one traumatic incident due to such little deer crossing awareness around these parts. Meet Artemis Lucky. The luckiest little deer to have been hit by a car… actually her mother was hit while she was almost term. Unfortunately for the mother deer and Artemis’ twin they were killed in the accident. And unfortunately for the driver of the car and her passenger, her daughter, became heart broken at what had happened. But fortunately for Artemis she survived. The woman who hit her mother was a doctor; even better an emergency room doctor. She acted calmly, compassionately, and professionally assessing over the baby deer’s situation. She unattached the umbilical cord then called 911 to not only report what had happened but to also tell them that there was a huge chance this baby would survive. Not feeling like that was enough or that the person on the other end of the line took it seriously enough she came to us for help. After all she was one of our guests. The baby deer wasn’t out of danger. Artemis laid a foot from the driving lane and her body temperature was dropping not to mention the possibility of becoming pray. Here at Sugar Pine Ranch caring for animals has never been an issue. It is something we have done most of our lives. My parents both grew up on ranches taking care of animals then raised us, their children, with the same compassion they learned through their experiences. After hearing about the deer it didn’t take very long for my fatherĀ and I to gather up what we needed to fetch her. Within a few hours, after a thorough check-over, heated towels, a warm water sponge wip-down, a blow dry, a little water, a call to a vet, and a small team of caregivers including the three of us and the Dr. and her daughter little Artemis Lucky was starting to show positive signs of being healthy. She was a bit premature and was obviously the runt of the two babies but her heartbeat was strong. She was a fighter. Perhaps if she had been born under normal circumstances she may not have survived but through a sad and terrible turn of events she was given a chance to survive. The next morning, after a good nights rest, she was turned over to the local deer rescue’s volunteer for transport to their facility where she will be cared for and eventually turned back into her natural habitat. Our initial meeting with Artemis Lucky was brief but left a lasting impression for everyone involved. We share this story for a few reasons: the first is that we are proud to have been able to help her and would like to introduce her to you, and the other is so that perhaps, whether you come to stay with us or not, while you’re driving around our lovely little piece of the world you’ll remember this story and be mindful that deer, like Artemis, like to cross the road all too often here. Perhaps one day Caltrans will finally put up more deer crossing signs. Until then, look ahead for deer near the road. And remember that where there is one there may be two, three, or more nearby and crossing the road too behind the first one you see. As a rule of thumb, you can count on that, so slow down and be prepared to stop suddenly.